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Analysis Into The Wild For Essay

In the book, “Into the Wild” by Christopher McCandless’s, is a true story about a young man name Emory who was found dead in the Alaskan wilderness in September 1992. Anyhow, McCandless is a senior at Emory. He has driven away most of his friends, and barely keeps in

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Into the Wild Analysis

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touch with his parents.

He lets his parents think that he is interested in law school, but instead, after graduating with honors, he donates his $25,000 savings to charity, gets in his car, and drives away without telling anyone where he is going, abandoning the use of his real name along the way.

His plan was to get away from city life, to be with nature. Shaun Callarman said that “I think that Chris McCandless was bright and ignorant at the same time. He had no common sense, and he had no business going into Alaska with his Romantic silliness. He made a lot of mistakes based on arrogance.

I don’t admire him at all for his courage nor his noble ideas. Really, I think he was just plain crazy.” I have to say that I agree with Shaun.

I agree with Shaun because McCandless didn’t look ahead of his future. Instead he just threw himself into the wind. Which can be good sometimes but in this case it was a poorly decision. I don’t think McCandless took the time to think about basic essentials like food, health, clothes, safety and loneliness.

I believe he was so driven by the anger of his dad, having a second family that he just wanting to escape that. I mean, a lot of people go through things like this; sometimes even worst.

Likewise, I don’t see them throwing themselves into nature like that. Very foolish! It would have been okay if he had made back safely or was better prepare to do this; but he wasn’t. Therefore he die because in late July, McCandless eats some moldy seeds and the mold contains a poison that essentially causes him to starve to death.

No matter how

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much he ate, he was to too weak to gather food . McCandless was quickly incapacitated by the poison. If he had known his information about nature and knew that the seeds were dangerous, he probably still would have been alive longer.

One thing I couldn’t wrap my head around was, those whom he tells about the plan all warn him that he needs to be better prepared, or should wait until later in the spring. Thus, being stubborn he still went on and did he own thing.

He was being hardheaded, which I feel like it another reason that lead to his death. In other words, these people who talk to him were like warnings. They even knew that it wasn’t a good idea but for some reason he didn’t pick on this. He went into Alaska without a map or planning of where he was going.

I’m surprised he lasted as long as he did. If he’d of just had a map he wouldn’t have been trap up at the river he was a crossing. But honestly the best thing was his realization that he does need other people, even though it was ultimately too late.

To sum up, I thought that Chris’ journey into the wilderness to seek the simple life was inspirational but he was extremely naive about his journey and was much unprepared for the conditions that he was facing.

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Whether he was a vagabond, genius, whack job, free spirit, rebel, or poet, Christopher McCandless (also known by the pseudonym Alexander Supertramp) was unique among men. At an age when most upper-class kids begin their arduous climb toward becoming the next big thing, Christopher McCandless went in the opposite direction—he became a nobody. His two-year descent into the furthest margins of society baffled and fascinated many, including author Jon Krakauer. Following an article he wrote for Outside magazine, Krakauer authored a painstaking reconstruction of McCandless’s odyssey, Into the Wild. In committing the story to paper, Krakauer attempts to answer one question: why did McCandless do it? It is an impossible question to answer no matter how earnestly Krakauer pursues it.

Krakauer acknowledges his own obsession in the introduction, and his crafting of the story raises its own questions. By fashioning the last two years of Christopher McCandless’s life into the book Into the Wild, is Krakauer making it a modern-day tragedy? Does Into the Wild invite parallels to notions of tragedy originating in ancient Greece? If so, what elements apply? Much of what we know about how the ancient Greeks developed and evaluated tragedy comes from Aristotle—or so some think. His treatise, Poetics, may not have been written by him and instead may represent the notes of a student or students at one of his many lectures. Either way, the document is still considered the starting point for any discussion of the nature of tragedy and includes analysis of tragedy’s composite elements. To examine Into the Wild's fitness for comparison, Aristotelian notions of tragic heroes and the definition of tragedy must be considered, along with staple structural elements like choruses and poetic language.

All tragedies center on a hero, so in order to determine whether Chris McCandless has been transformed into one in Krakauer’s book, McCandless’s resemblance to a tragic hero must be established in specific terms. In the Greek model, tragic heroes usually come from noble families. While Chris was neither a prince nor the son of a politician, he did come from an upper-class background. He also went on a journey, as many tragic heroes do. Yet the real test of his status as a tragic hero is his embodiment of a trait the Greeks called hamartia. Since it is a translated term, its exact meaning is often debated but can generally be interpreted as “tragic flaw,” a trait that blindsides the hero and leads him to his own ruin. While some would certainly argue that McCandless was fanatical or hubristic in taking on nature itself, that definition does not quite fit the McCandless depicted in Into the Wild. After all, Krakauer’s whole purpose in writing the book was to try to determine what trait led McCandless down his ultimately terminal path. Mere pride or adolescent stupidity seems like an incomplete answer.

Another interpretation of hamartia presents it less as a character flaw than a misunderstanding of one’s place in the world. In this light, hamartia seems to fit Chris McCandless quite well. The rich kid who leaves the material world, his family, and his identity behind to pursue enlightenment in the natural landscape seems the very definition of someone looking for his place. In some ways, Krakauer presents McCandless’s transformation into Alexander Supertramp in this light in Into the Wild: an ambitious young man who erroneously saw himself as an adventurer in the outdoors. Linking hamartia to the fate of a tragic hero is crucial to this interpretation. According to Into the Wild, Chris McCandless died because of his own misconception of himself.

In the Greek tragic...

(The entire section is 1543 words.)

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